Recipes, produce information and forum for Zoe's Garden Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) members. Zoe's Garden offers CSA subscriptions in the Park City, Heber, Salt Lake, Ogden & Lindon areas. Our purpose is to provide the freshest naturally grown produce possible by delivering it to our local members within a day of picking.

Friday, November 12, 2010

Holiday Box

There wasn't enough interest in the Holiday box for David to do the whole route.  But he has to go to Salt Lake and Park City anyway next week.  And he has jerusalem artichokes and several other items.  So if you live near the farm - or in Salt Lake or Park City - and are interested in getting some items, please give David a call directly on his cell:  801-721-8238.  Thanks!  Happy Holidays : )

Friday, October 29, 2010

Whats in your extra share this week.

Small
1.  Mix green
2.  Dikon Radish
3.  Red beet
4.  Cucumber
5.  Tomato
6.  Banana Squash
7.  Apple

Medium
1.  Russetted potato
2.  Winter Squash

Large
1.  Cabbage
2.  Extra Banana Squash
3.  Extra mix green
4.  Chinese Kale
5.  Extra winter squash

Tomatoes Froze : ( No Picking on Sunday.

As the tomatoes were finally ripening this week, they froze : (  That's the way of farming.  So we're sorry to report that there will be no member picking day on Sunday.  David will till them into the earth and they will nourish next year's crops : )

If you forgot to leave your boxes, there is still time to return them.

I've had a couple members email me to tell me they forgot to leave/return their last boxes.  Don't worry.  There is still time.  David will be making one more round to the normal drop locations next week to pick up all the boxes.  So if you forgot, please make sure to return them before your regularly scheduled pick-up day.  Thanks!

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Looking for Blog Editor - Trade for 2011 medium share

If anyone is interested in trading a medium share for being the blog editor next year, please email zoe@zoegarden.com.  This would include weekly posts about recipes, produce information (through web searches and conversations with David, the grower) and general information that David needs to get out to members.  Pass it on : )  Thanks!

Monday, October 25, 2010

Return All Boxes, Bring Shopping bags, please : )

This is the last week of shares.  Thanks everyone for a great season.  Please bring your own bags or boxes to transfer all your produce - so your last boxes can be left at the drop point for David to pick up.

I will be posting information about the holiday box as soon as I have more information.

For next year's sign-up and payment, we are working with a software called "Farmigo".  When that is launched and ready to go, I'll send out a blog post to let you know we're ready.  There will be an early bird discount for those who sign up early.

Thanks : )
Alissa

Sunday, October 24, 2010

Too Rainy & Muddy - Tomato day cancelled

The fields are too muddy from the rain.  So we're canceling the tomato day.  Sorry to anyone who made the trek.  If they don't freeze this week, we'll try again next week.  We'll keep you posted : )

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

What's in your share this week

Small
1.  Mix green
2.  Red Beet
3.  Tomato
4.  Market More cucumber
5.  Russetted potato
6.  Mix squash
7.  Black radish
8.  Red meat radish
9.  Sweet Meat squash
10. Asian Pear

Medium
1.  Extra potato
2.  Chinese Kale
3.  White Patty Pan squash

Large
1.  Extra mix green
2.  Extra potato
3.  Spinach
4.  Parsnips
5.  Turnips
6.  Green cabbage
7.  Red Cabbage

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Extra Week Free, Plus Free Tomatoes for members

Zoe's Garden is giving our members one extra week free, going all the way through to October 29 for the Friday shares.  If you are a drop host and are unable to host for an extra week or are a member and won't be able to pick up your share, please email zoe@zoegarden.com.

It's been strange weather this year, and things like broccoli and cauliflower that normally would have ripened weeks ago are just starting to ripen.  Most of the tomatoes have also held out on us until now.  But there is still over 1000 pounds in the fields.  So on Sunday, October 24th from 10am - 4pm, members only can come to the farm and pick as many tomatoes as they can carry away (assuming we don't get a frost that kills them all between now and then).

Holiday Box
We will also be offering a holiday box to be delivered the week before Thanksgiving (Nov 16th, 17th & 19th). There will be a price for this - to be determined as we get closer and know exactly what will be in it.  But we think it will include winter squash, potatoes, shallots, jerusalem artichokes (sunchokes), and beets. Email zoe@zoegarden.com if you're interested.

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

What's in your share list this week.

Small
1.  Mix green
2.  Bull's Blood Beet
3.  Tomato
4.  Marketmore cucumber
5.  Russetted potato
6.  Green cabbage
7.  White Patty Pan squash
8.  Black radish
9.  Lemon cucumber
10. Arugula
11. Mix green bean

Medium
1.  Peach
2.  Dandelion
3.  Zephyr Squash
4.  Yellow patty pan squash

Large
1.  Vitamin Green
2.  Purple cauliflower
3.  Broccoli
4.  Extra mix green
5.  Banana squash
6.  Extra Dandelion and green bean

Tuesday, October 5, 2010

What's in your shar this week

SMAll
1.  Mix Green
2.  Bull's Blood Beet
3.  Broccoli Raab
4.  Tomato
5.  Peach
6.  Hubbard Squash
7.  Market More Cucumber
8.  Russetted Potato
9.  Green Cabbage
10. White Patty Pan squash
11.  Yellow Patty Pan squash

Medium
1.  Green Zucchini
2.  Straightneck Squash
3.  Sunburst Squash
4.  Zephyr Squash

Large
1.  Gala Apple
2. Golden Apple
3.  Bartlett Pear
4.  Bell Pepper
5.  Shungiku
6.  Red Meat Radish
7.  Extra Hubbard Squash
8.  Butternut Squash 

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

What's in your share this week

Small
1. mix green
2. White Radish
3. Red Radish
4. White Paty Pan Squash
5. Yellow Paty Pan Squash
6. Bull's Blood Beets
7. Arugula
8. Straight Eight Cucumber
9. Peach
10. Tomato
11. Prune
12. Banana Squash

Medium
1. Yellow Zucchini
2. Green Zucchini
3. Straightneck Squash
4. Zephyr Squash
5. Chinese Okra

Large

1. Green Cabbage
2. Artichoke
3. Collard Green
4. Red meat Radish
5. Armenian Cucumber
6. Extra mix green
7. Baby Bok Choy
8. Extra Banana Squash

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Lavendar & Herbal Honey

I know it's been a long time since we had the lavender in our share, but I just came across this great use for it.  So if you happened to dry some of your lavender . . .

Herbal Honey
Take 4-6 stems of fresh lavender, or 2 four-inch pieces of fresh rosemary, and submerge in a one-pint jar of honey. Screw the cap on tight and put in a sunny window for two weeks. Every day or two, invert the jar several times. Taste after two weeks and see if the herbal flavor is strong enough for you. If not, repeat for one more week. You may remove the herbs before using the honey, or leave them in.

What's in Your Share this week

Small
Tomatillo
Tomato
Green Bell Pepper
Apple
Hales Peach
Red Radish
White Radish
Papaya Squash
Yellow Sunburst Patty Pan Squash
White Patty Pan Squash
Green Zucchini
Straight Eight Cucumber
Bull's blood Beets
Mixed Greens
Bok Choy
Shungiku
Mache


Medium
All of Small share plus
Stanley Prunes
Pasilla Pepper
Extra Mache
Extra Bok Choy
Flying Saucer Squash
Crooked Neck Squash
Dark Green Zucchini

Large
All of Medium Share Plus
Cabbage
Purple Beans
Chinese Okra
Bitter Melon
Purple Ruffle Basil
Gala Apple
Anaheim Peppers
Extra of many items on the small share list

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

We'll miss you Jessica!

Thank you to Jessica for being our blog editor while you could.  You did a fantastic job.  Best wishes in all your future endeavors.

Members: For the rest of the season, David will be posting the share lists here each week.  If you have any specific questions regarding what's in your share or how to use it, please give David a call at 801-721-8238. And please feel free to contribute recipes and ideas on either the blog or Facebook.

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

In your share this week

Small Share:
mixed greens
white radish
red radish
white patty pan squash
yellow patty pan squash
straight neck squash
papaya squash
golden zucchini
green bell pepper
poblano pepper
lemon alberta peach
suncrest peach
stanley prunes
baby artichoke
bok choy

Medium Share:
bigger quantities of the small share, plus
green zucchini squash
zephyr squash
raspberries
tomato

Large Share:
bigger quantities of the small and medium share, plus
gala apple
blackberry
wealthy apple
blue kale
spinach
opal squash
8 ball zucchini
extra bag of mixed squash

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Cold Summer Nights

Hello Everyone,

Small Share:
Spicy Green Salad Mix
Bok Choy
Mixed Variety Squash
Monroe Peach
21st Century Asian Pear
Small Tart Peach
Tomato

Medium Share:
All of Small Share
Extra Mixed Variety Squash
Beets

Large Share:
All of Medium Share
Extra Bok Choy
Extra Mixed Variety Squash
Artichoke
Blackberry
Raspberry
Cabbage
Purple Basil
Beet Greens

Enjoy!
Jessica

Sunday, September 5, 2010

Simple and Delicious Fruit Tart

Photo Courtesy of Life123.com


Since we recieved peaches, blackberries and raspberries in our share this week I really would like to make a fruit tart for dessert.

  • Here is a recipe for a simple, easy fruit tart at Food Network.

  • Here is a recipe for a more healthy fruit tart that is gluten-free and sugar free (without substitutes like Splenda) courtesy of Simply Sugar and Gluten Free.
Hope you all have a sweet Labor Day holiday,

Jessica

Thursday, September 2, 2010

Not Your Average Basil: Using Thai Basil


Photo Courtesy of Xotic Spice

Thai Sweet Basil, or Anise/Licorice Basil (Bai Horapa): This tropical variety of sweet basil provides the unusual basil flavor present in so many Thai dishes that it has come to be identified as "Thai basil" in America, even though the Vietnamese and Laotians also use lots of it in their cuisines. Its leaves are deep green, smaller and not as round as Western sweet basil. They grow on purplish stems, topped with pretty, reddish purple flower buds. Both leaves and edible flowers are have a strong basil scent and an equally strong under note of anise or licorice. The flavor is just as distinct as its scent, when some people think of licorice - black twizzlers come to mind, but the flavor is much more complex and exciting to the palate.


Plentiful in Thailand, bai horapa is eaten almost as a vegetable, and I have found it's flavor equally pleasing whether it is raw or cooked. It goes well with anything made with coconut: milk, cream or juice. It is also a great replacement for cilantro...

As with many leafy herbs, this basil can be kept fresh by placing it in a glass with the cut ends in water, covering it with a plastic bag and storing it in the refrigerator. Or, you can wrap the herbs in paper towels before bagging them in plastic before refrigerating. They will stay fresh for about a week."-excerpt and picture from the blog Xotic Spice 

I still have a bag full of Thai basil left in my refridgerator, so I am hoping to try this recipe for Thai basil pesto.

Thai Basil Pesto-courtesy of the blog From Scratch




Ingredients:

•1/3 cup peanuts

•1 cup Thai basil

•1/3 cup cilantro

•4 cloves garlic

•1 TB lime juice

•1 small red chili (I left the seeds in, if you aren't a spice fiend you might want to scrape the seeds out)

•1/3 cup vegetable oil (although, next time I'm going to try peanut oil, I was out when I made this)

Directions:
I am sans food processor right now, so I just tossed all peanuts, herbs, garlic, and pepper in my spice grinder, tossed the resulting paste in a mixing bowl and added the lime juice and the vegetable oil and used a hand mixer to combine everything. I used half of it for Rice Noodle Stir Fry with Thai Basil Pesto , and froze the other half in a ziploc bag in the freezer.

Note: Because of the lack of a substitute for the cheese in Italian style pesto, this paste doesn't have much in the way of a salty flavor. Next time I make this I may add a TB of fish sauce--but then again may not, since almost everything I will probably cook with this with with have Nuoc Cham on the side.

Let me know how you've been using your Thai basil at produce@zoegarden.com.

Jessica

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

Bitter and Full of Nutrients


Bitter gourd has a variety of health benefits, including helping with disorders such as diabetes, blood issues, cholera, fatigue, hangover, toxemia, skin disorders, and respiratory disorders. Aside from helping to alleviate symptoms of these ailments, bitter gourd is also very high in vitamins and nutrients and is an excellent source of dietary fiber. Eating it may also help boost the immune system and is considered a healthy way to promote healthy vision and eye function.
  
One of the most well known medical uses of bitter gourd is to help lower blood sugar in diabetics, and to increase insulin tolerance in those with diabetes and pre-diabetes. This is possible because the gourd contains a type of plant insulin, which helps level out the body’s insulin levels naturally. Blood sugar levels should still be monitored, but a regimen using this gourd may be appropriate for many diabetics.

Bitter gourd also has substances which helps the body rid itself of toxins at a faster pace than usual. Drinking the juice from bitter gourd may help the blood get rid of toxic substances and it may improve liver function so that the body can flush toxins away naturally. This is useful in helping alleviate many diseases and conditions like toxemia and hangover. By improving immune function, this fruit also helps to prevent illnesses and some cancers by allowing white blood cells to work for efficiently.


Blood conditions and other disorders may also be helped by consuming bitter gourd juice or by eating the fruit. The fruit itself may help prevent colon cancer because it is especially high in dietary fiber and helps rid the colon of compacted waste material. The juice can be mixed with other ingredients to make the taste more palatable for those who can’t stand the bitter flavor.


The gourd may work better when used in combination with other healing foods or juices, such as onion juice, lime juice, or certain teas. Juice from the bitter gourd fruit can be sipped slowly throughout the day and can be taken long-term. No side effects have been reported when bitter melon is taken as directed.


It is important not to consume too much bitter gourd juice in one day or to consume more than two fruits per day. Gastrointestinal upset may occur, and can include abdominal cramps and diarrhea. Diabetics who use this fruit to lower blood sugar may need to alter their doses of any medications being taken to avoid low blood sugar. ---information courtesy of wisegeek




Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Fuzzy Vegetables and Fruit For All

Zoe's Garden Large Share for August 31, 2010

Above: The more oval shaped tomatoes are
 the San Marzano Tomatoes
 while the heirloom tomatoes are round,
 but different sizes and colors.

Above: The Thai basil has purple flowers,
 while the Sweet basil is all green.

Above: On the left is the Chinese Yellow Cucumber
 and on the right is the Chinese Fuzzy Melon.

Above: At the front is the Chinese Snow Broccoli,
 top right is the blue kale, top left is the cabbage.
Small Share:
Yellow Onion
White Onion
Beets
Green Zucchini
Crookneck Squash
Pattypan Squash
Zephyr Squash
White Radishes
Sweet Basil
San Luzano Tomatoes
Salad Mix (Spicy)
**Includes Frisee, Arugula and other strong flavored greens
Virginia Peaches
Chinese Yellow Cucumber

Medium Share:
All of the Small Share
Baby Bok Choy
Blue Kale
Golden Zucchini
White Pattypan Squash
Flying Saucer Pattypan Squash
Extra Squash
Raspberries

Large Share:
All of the Medium Share
Blackberries
Extra Squash, mixed varieties
Eight-Ball Zucchini
Chinese Green Beans
Chinese Snow Broccoli
Chinese Purple Eggplant
Chinese Fuzzy Melon
Thai Basil
Heirloom Tomatoes

Note: Don't be fooled the Chinese Fuzzy Melon is not a melon, and can be prepared much like zucchini.

"Once heard that fuzzy melon is rarely found outside the Asian markets. If you do get it, try to consume it fresh and avoid storing it. The longer it is stored, the more its pleasant flavour will be lost. Before cooking, rub off the skin of the fuzzy melon with a small knive lengthway, its hairy skin is too thin to be removed by a peeler. Then cut it into slices or cubes. Because of its mild flavour, the melon is usually stir fried with meat, shrimps, ginger and shallots."-Taste Hong Kong

Have a great week!
Jessica

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Straight from the Farmer: Tomatoes

Photo Courtesy of  the Redd Blog
Hi Everyone!

The heirloom tomatoes are really starting to ripen and will continue to be a part of your share in the upcoming weeks. Some are firm and some have really ripened. We did pick everything fresh so I would recommend that you enjoy the softer tomatoes first. Lastly, the flavor of your tomatoes is best preserved by not refrigerating them.

"Refrigeration is the enemy of the tomato as it nullifies flavor and turns the flesh mealy. The culprit is a compound called Z-3 hexenel, which accounts for the tomato's scent and taste. The development process which turns tomato's linolenic acid to the Z-3 that makes our mouth and nose sing is hindered by cold. If you must refrigerate a tomato, take it out about an hour before using it to let it return to room temperature to revive any lurking Z-3." --explanation provided by about.com:homecooking.


Hope you enjoy!

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Eat Your Greens


**See that bright green bumpy item in the front of the picture above? That is the Chinese Bitter Melon.
 
So...another beautiful summer night. The crickets are chirping and my laptop is fighting with all of the salad greens for space on the kitchen table.

Weekly Share List:
Small Share:
Red Marble Onion
Yellow Onion
White Onion
Black Beauty Zucchini
Striped Zucchini
Zephyr Squash
Crookneck Squash
Papaya Squash
Sunburst Pattypan Squash
Mixed Greens (spicy)
Triple Crown Blackberries
Thai Basil
Mixed Heirloom Tomatoes (various colors)
Medium Share
White Pattypan Squash
Cucumber
Green Eight Ball Zucchini
Artichokes
Arugula
Large Share
Cabbage
Amaranthus Leaf
Extra Salad Mix
Extra Tomatoes
Extra Thai Basil
Yellow Eight-Ball Zucchini
Extra Squash (mixed variety)
Chinese Bitter Melon

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Sweet Summer Selections: Berries and Sweet Corn

Good Morning,

Small Share:
• Salad Mix (Spicy)
**Includes Frisee, Arugula and other strong flavored greens
• Sweet Corn (2 ears)
• Thai Basil
• Tomato
• Yellow Onion
• White Onion
• Red Marble Onion
• Chester Blackberry
• Cylindra Beet
**This is a longer beet, similar to a carrot shape.
• Green Zucchini
• Eight-Ball Zucchini
• Pattypan Squash
Medium Share:
• All of the Small Share
• Sweet Corn (6 ears total)
• Light Green Eight-Ball Zucchini
• Crookneck Squash
• Black Beauty Zucchini
• Zephyr Squash
*These squash are multi-colored yellow on top and light green on the bottom
• Shingiku Greens
• Extra Thai Basil
Large Share:
• All of the Medium Share
• Cabbage
• Amaranthus Leaf
• Baby Bok Choy
• Sweet Corn (12 ears total)
• Red Raspberries
• Extra Blackberries
• Extra of the following varieties of squash/zucchini squash
     o Papaya Squash
     o Extra Pattypan Squash
     o Yellow Eight-Ball Zucchini
     o Crookneck Squash
     o Zephyr Squash
     o Black Beauty Zucchini
     o Mediterranean Zucchini
     o Starship Pattypan Squash
• Extra Thai Basil
• Shingiku Greens

Corn: Please contact me by email if you have any critters/insects in your corn. David did not think there were insects in the majority of them, but he did not want to open everyone’s corn to find out.

Boxes: Do you forget to bring your boxes back? To prevent forgetting my boxes at home I have been bringing reusable bags to my share pick up site, and leaving the boxes there. If you ever forget to return your box, please return it the next week.

Note: If you have multiple boxes at home, please bring them to your site the next time you pick up your share.

Update: Last week there were not raspberries in the small share. I apologize for the miscommunication.

Missing Produce: Sometimes between all of the things David and I are trying to accomplish on share drop-off days our wires get crossed. I hope this happens very rarely, but if you feel like your box differs from the list I have posted, please call or text (801)557-3800 specifying your name, phone number and share pick-up site information and I’ll do my best to get it straightened out a.s.a.p.

Blog Feedback: Thank you for being members of the Zoe’s Garden CSA. Our goal is to offer this blog as a resource, and therefore we need your feedback. Please email me at produce@zoegarden.com if there are other things you would like to see on the blog, if there are too many postings coming into your email inbox, or any other suggestions.

Member Suggestion: If you have anymore apricots left one member recommends dropping them in a pot of hot water for just a few seconds, and then the skin will easily fall off. She then discards the skins and pits and mashes the rest of the apricot. You can freeze the mashed apricots, add it to yogurt and cereal, used in dressings or desserts.

This week I will be trying to create a Thai inspired dish using the Thai basil, zucchini, onions and cabbage.

From our garden to your kitchen, happy eating.
Jessica

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Apricot and Basil Salad Dressing

Photo Courtesy of Elana's Pantry


Ingredients:
•1 fresh ripe apricot, pitted
•1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
•1/2 tbsp maple syrup or agave nectar
•2 tbsp olive oil
•1 tbsp chopped fresh basil or 1 tsp dried basil

Preparation:
Combine pitted apricot, vinegar and syrup in blender, and whirl until blended. With blender running, slowly add oil until thick and smooth. Stir in basil.

Ripe Apricots and Spicy Greens

Hello,


Small Share:
Yellow Onion
Red Marble Onion
White Onion
Beet and Beet Greens
**The tops of the beets are a sweeter greens
Green Zucchini
Salad Mix (Spicy)
**Includes Frisee, Arugula and other strong flavored greens
Sweet Basil
Tomato
Apricots
**These were picked today and are very ripe. You can dry or freeze them if you will be unable to eat them all right away.
Chester Blackberry
Yellow Pattypan Squash
Zephyr Squash
**This squash is the multi-colored squash with a yellow top and light green bottom.
Red Raspberries

Medium Share:
All of the Small Share
Eight Ball Zucchini
Zucchini
Yellow Zucchini
Yellow Pepper

Large Share:
All of the Medium Share
Turnip Greens
**These are the full stemmed, rougher, more textured leaf greens.
Baby Bok Choy
Cabbage
Artichokes (Small)
Extra Apricots
Extra Salad Mix

If you have any questions about what is in your share please email me at produce@zoegarden.com.

From our garden to your kitchen, happy eating.

Jessica

Friday, August 6, 2010

Stuffed Zucchini

Good Evening Everyone,

So around our house we've been eating a lot of zucchini. How about you? We've had some great pasta with zucchini, made stir fry, added it to salads, and grilled it on the barbecue. About a week ago we also tried stuffing it, which is what David recommended to me for the older zucchinis, especially the Eight-Ball Zucchini.
Stuffed Zucchini 
-8-ball zucchini, regular zucchini, hollowed out, use what you take out in the stuffing mixture.
-1/2 cup of wild rice and 1/2 cup of brown basmati rice cooked in 4 cups of water and 1 1/2 to 2 vegetable boullion cubes. Once the rice is to your liking, strain and keep the broth on the stove while moving the rice into a separate bowl.
Side Note: I soak the basmati rice for an hour prior to remove the phytic acid. If you are interested in learning about soaking grain/legumes check out Nourishing Practices.
-In a separate pan cook 3 chicken sausages. I removed the casing and broke the meat into crumbles as it cooked. Add the meat to the broth pot once fully cooked.
Side Note: This recipe doesn't need meat, or it can be your favorite local, organic meat instead. Your choice.
-Saute onions and garlic in olive oil or in the leftover oil from your meat. Add the sliced leeks and mushrooms after the onions and garlic have had a chance to carmelize. After about 5-7 minutes add everything to the liquid mixture. Simmer for 15 minutes. Add the zucchini extras to this mixture, and strain liquid (saving it for soup). Add mixture into hollowed out zucchinis. Cook zucchini in oven at 350 degrees for 20 minutes or barbecue.
Side Note: The leftover broth, and stuffed zucchini make a great soup for lunches.

Enjoy!

Jessica

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

Artichokes!




Hello Everyone,


Small Share:
Salad Mix (Spicy)
Tomato
Oregano
Nova Red Raspberries
Arapaho Blackberries
Garlic
White Onion
Yellow Potato Onion
Red Marble Onion
Eight Ball Zucchini
Regular Zucchini
Sunburst Scallop Squash
Beets
Beet Greens

Medium Share:
All of the Small Share
Red Fire Lettuce
Malabar Spinach
Extra Eight Ball Zucchini

Large Share:
All of the Medium Share
Amaranthus Leaf
Crookneck Squash
Pattypan Squash
Chinese Green Beans
Artichokes
Extra Onions
Extra Summer Squash
Extra Berries





HAVING A HARD TIME IDENTIFYING WHAT IS IN YOUR SHARE?
CLICK ABOVE TO ENLARGE IMAGES



WEEKLY UPDATE FROM DAVID:
Oregano: Try using the flowers in salads.
CSA FARM TOUR: Did anyone have a chance to attend? What did you think? Email me at produce@zoegarden.com
Above: Spaghetti with Zucchini Squash
Below: Drying vegetables after rinsing.


















From our garden to your kitchen, happy eating.

Jessica

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Real Food: what to do with the bugs, dirt and other residue

Photo Courtesy of Men's Journal


Hello There...

 As you read through the list, there are some things we won't need to worry about with our sustainably grown produce. However, it is a great guide for the bugs, dirt, and other organic residue.

How to Wash Fruits and Vegetables


•Start by keeping your kitchen countertops, refrigerator, cookware and cutlery clean.
•Always wash your hands before preparing meals and handling fruits and vegetables.
•Keep fresh greens, fruits and vegetables away from uncooked meats to avoid cross-contamination.
•Choose healthy looking, ripe fruits and vegetables when you shop. Avoid bruised, moldy and mushy produce.
•Wait until just before you eat or prepare your fruits and vegetables to wash them. Fruits and vegetables have natural coatings that keep moisture inside, and washing them will make them spoil sooner.
•Wash all pre-packaged fruits and vegetables, even if the label claims they are pre-washed.
•Wash all parts of your fruits and vegetables, even if you don't plan on eating them. Bacteria can live on the rind of an orange or the skin of a cucumber, for example. Though you may peel them away and toss them in the trash, the bacteria can be transferred from the outside of the fruit or vegetable to the knife you use to cut them, and then onto the parts you will be eating.
•Gently rub fruits and vegetables under running water. Don't use any soaps, detergents, bleaches or other toxic cleaning chemicals. These chemicals will leave a residue of their own on your produce.
•Commercial sprays and washes sold for cleaning vegetables really aren't any better than cleaning thoroughly with plain water, so don't waste your money on them.
•Firmer fruits and vegetables, such as apples and potatoes, can be scrubbed with a vegetable brush (buy direct) while rinsing with clean water to remove dirt and residues.
•Remove and discard the outer leaves of lettuce and cabbage heads, and thoroughly rinse the rest of the leaves.
•Rinse berries and other small fruits thoroughly and allow them to drain in a colander.

Remember that the fruits and vegetables you buy may look clean when you pick them out at the grocery store, but you can't see bacteria or chemicals. Your fruits and vegetables still need to be washed before you eat them or serve them to guests or family members. This is especially important for produce and greens that are eaten raw.

Thank you About.com for this posting. Comments? Please email me at produce@zoegarden.com.

Jessica

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Fresh, delicious produce with a side of gratitude.


Good Evening,

I hope you are all enjoying your share thus far. As wishful thoughts of the autumn months creep into my head on days when the temperature is above 90 degrees, I quickly remind myself how appreciative I am for all that summer has to offer. I am also grateful to David for working in the hot sun to bring us so many delicious varieties of fresh produce. Each week I call, and each week he has already been working since before sunrise and well into the heat of each day. So with that, here is your weekly share list. Enjoy!

Small Share:
Garlic
White Onion
Yellow Potato Onion
Red Marble Onion
Kohlrabi
Early Flat Dutch Cabbage
Chinese Buttercruch Lettuce (small share will receive a smaller head of lettuce)
Garlic Chives
Small Tomato
Summer Squash
Chemainus Red Raspberry
Arapaho Blackberries

Medium Share:
All of the Small Share
Yellow Squash
Chinese Broccoli
Chinese Green Bean
Lambert Cherries
Buttercrunch Lettuce (medium share will receive a larger head of lettuce)

Large Share:
All of the Medium Share
Malabar Spinach
Baby Bok Choy
Snow Peas
Leeks
Italian Parsley
Eight-Ball Zucchini
Regular Zucchini
Papaya Squash
Sunburst Pattypan Squash
Extra Blackberries
Extra Raspberries
Extra Cherries

HAVING A HARD TIME IDENTIFYING WHAT IS IN YOUR SHARE?
CLICK ABOVE TO ENLARGE IMAGE

WEEKLY UPDATE FROM DAVID:

CHERRIES: The cherries are very ripe this week, and are not fresh picked today. They were picked within the last week and refrigerated due to the heat.

CSA FARM TOUR: CSA Utah Tour 2010
Date: Monday, August 2nd
Fee: FREE! But please RSVP to Jeff at 801-557-0521 or jeff.williams@ut.usda.gov
Bus: There is room for approximately 45 people so “first come, first served”
Time: 8:30 to 3:00
Bring: water, sun screen, hiking boots, hat, camera, writing materials, networking information
Departure time and place: Fashion Place West Trax Stop on Park and Ride at Winchester (400 South and 222 West), bus leaves at 9 am
1st stop: Bell’s 9:30 to 10:30
2nd stop: East 11:00 to 12:00
Lunch: Please bring a brown bag lunch and drink
3rd stop: Zoe’s 1:00 to 2:00
Return time: about 3pm

NEXT WEEK: There is a possibility of peaches (medium share), beets and arugula in next weeks’ share.

From our garden to your kitchen, happy eating.

Jessica

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Sweet and Savory


Good Evening,


This week’s share has a variety of items to fit right in to our summertime cuisine. From berries and arugula that can be eaten without preparation. Onions, zucchini, and kohlrabi that can complement any grilled meal. To cabbage and frisee, which are perfect for light meals in the summer heat.

Small Share:

Red Italian Dandelion Greens
Grey Zucchini
Great Lakes Lettuce
Early Flat Dutch Cabbage
Garlic
White Onions
Walla Walla Onions
Marble Onions
Dinkum Raspberries
Cilantro
White Venus Kohlrabi
Lambert Cherries.

Medium Share:

Red Leaf Lettuce
Arapaho Blackberries
Eight-Ball Zucchini

Large Share:

Arugula
Frisee
Mustard Greens
Brandywine Raspberries
Blackcap Raspberries
Crookneck Squash
Extra Eight-Ball Zucchini
Mixed Long Zucchini
Extra Dinkum Raspberries


HAVING A HARD TIME IDENTIFYING WHAT IS IN YOUR SHARE?
CLICK ABOVE TO ENLARGE IMAGE

WEEKLY UPDATE FROM DAVID:
CHERRIES AND BLACK CAP RASPBERRIES: This is the last of the Cherries and Blackcap Raspberries.

FRUIT: David tries to bring us the ripest fruits so it is often important to eat the fruit in your share quickly or freeze it to preserve it for a later date.

NEXT WEEK: There is a possibility of apricots in next weeks’ share.

SAME BUT DIFFERENT: Special Note. The Arapaho Blackberries can quickly disguise the Blackcap Raspberries. Please see the tiles to see a comparison between the two berries. Also, the Mustard Greens and the Frisee were bagged together. Again, please see the picture tiles. The Mustard Greens have edges that are more loose, less crinkled.

I am excited to grate and cube some of the extra zucchini and freeze it. In winter I will add the cubes to soups and use the grated zucchini in breads. Also, I am going to make a salad with the frisee, arugula and berries for lunch tomorrow.

From our garden to your kitchen, happy eating.

Jessica

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Kohlrabi Dishes


Kohlrabi Puree:

from the blog Foodie Farm Girl

Note: You can leave the mushrooms out if you don't have them handy.

Ingredients:
4 kohlrabi bulbs with leaves
2 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
4 ounces cultivated mushrooms (I used Baby Bellas), quartered
3 Tablespoons cream (or milk, chicken stock, olive oil, or water)
salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Trim the kohlrabi bulbs, peeling them if the skins seem tough. Rinse the leaves (discarding any that are yellow) pat them dry, and coarsely chop. Set aside. But the bulbs into 1-inch chunks.
2. Bring a saucepan of lightly salted water to a boil, and add the kohlrabi chunks. Reduce the heat and simmer until tender, about 15 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a skillet. Add the onion and sauté over medium-low heat until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, another 1 to 2 minutes. Do not let garlic brown.
4. Add the mushrooms and the reserved kohlrabi leaves to the skillet. Cover, and cook 5 minutes. Then uncover, and cook, stirring, until all the liquid has evaporated, 3 minutes. Set the skillet aside.
5. Drain the kohlrabi chunks and place them in the bowl of a food processor. Add the mushroom mixture and all the remaining ingredients. Purée until smooth.
6. Transfer the purée to a saucepan and reheat over low heat, stirring, 2 minutes.


Roasted Kohlrabi
from the All Recipes Website

Ingredients:
4 kohlrabi bulbs, peeled
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
salt and pepper to taste
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Directions:
Preheat an oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).
Cut the kohlrabi into 1/4 inch thick slices, then cut each of the slices in half. Combine olive oil, garlic, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Toss kohlrabi slices in the olive oil mixture to coat. Spread kohlrabi in a single layer on a baking sheet.
Bake in the preheated oven until browned, 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally in order to brown evenly. Remove from oven and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Return to the oven to allow the Parmesan cheese to brown, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately.

Thanks to Alissa for sharing. Let me know what you think of these recipes or tell me ways you've prepared your kohlrabi.

Jessica

Mystery Items In Your Share


If you are having a hard time identifying any of the 23+ varieties in your share this week...please click on this link or the image below. 









Have a great night,
Jessica

Getting Some Summer Color: Raspberries, Tomatoes and Lavender


Hi Everyone,

Hope you are enjoying the long summer days and colorful produce you picked up today.

Small Share:
Garlic
Walla Walla Onions
White Onion
Red Onion
Shingiku Greens
English Lavender
Sugar Snap Peas
Prelude Raspberry
Bing Cherries
Garlic Chives
Purple Venus Kohlrabi
Summer Squash-variety
Lettuce-variety
Turnip Greens

Medium Share:
All of Small Share
English Peas
White Venus Kohlrabi

Large Share:
All of Medium Share
Extra Bing Cherries
Extra Prelude Raspberries
Extra English Lavender
Extra Lettuce-variety
Red Leaf Lettuce
Buttercrunch Lettuce
Black Beauty Zucchini
Crookneck Squash
Yellow Eight-Ball Zucchini
Light Green Eight-Ball Zucchini
Amaranthus Leaf
Tomatoes


Weekly Update from David:

Lavender: Can be dried, use flowers in salad, cooked into pastries, added into ice cream, tea or coffee.

Zucchini: If the zucchini you received are more mature, David recommends stuffing them. The blog Fat Free Vegan has a recipe I am excited to try, Eight-Ball Zucchini stuffed with Rice, Basil and Sun Dried Tomatoes. I think I will be using a barbecue instead of an oven in order to keep my home cooler during the cooking process.

Garlic Chives: David recommends cooking them as a vegetable instead of as an herb.

Lettuce: If the leaves of your lettuce are wilting from the heat, soak them in cold water for 30-60 minutes, shake out water, dry with a towel or use a salad spinner and store in an airtight bag.

Raspberries: David recommends eating these right away since they are so ripe. If you want to use them at a later date he recommends freezing them.

Cherries: Enjoy, this is the last share of Bing Cherries we will be receiving.

Peas: David recommends cooking the English Peas since they are more mature at this point in the season. You can steam or add to a dish that you will be baking like a casserole or  a vegetables and rice dish.

Kohlrabi: If you have aphids on your kohlrabi, soak in cold water and then rinse while brushing the leaves with your fingers. I will be posting more information on aphids within a day or two.


I will be doing a follow-up post with the identification pictures shortly as well as including recipes that members have submitted and information on aphids.


From our garden to your kitchen, happy eating.

Jessica












Tuesday, July 6, 2010

Curry, Cherries and Chocolate Mint


Good Evening All,

This week there is a possibility of 15 varieties in your share.

Small Share:
Walla Walla Onions
Kohlrabi
Redbor Kale
Young Garlic
Bing Cherries
Fresh Curry
Chocolate Mint
Sugar Snap Peas
Salad Mix: (bitter)
    arugula
    mustard
    endive
Garlic Scapes

Medium Share:
All of Small Share
Broccoli Raab
Red Romaine Lettuce

Large Share:
All of Medium Share
English Peas
Extra Walla Walla Onions
Extra Bing Cherries
Extra Redbor Kale
Extra Garlic Scapes


HAVING A HARD TIME IDENTIFYING WHAT IS IN YOUR SHARE?
CLICK ABOVE TO ENLARGE IMAGE

  ABOVE: CHOCOLATE MINT
 BELOW: FRESH CURRY

WEEKLY UPDATE FROM DAVID:

SHARE BOXES: Please be respectful of our drop-off sites and stack your returned boxes neatly. Also, please return your share box(es) each week when you pick up your new box. By not reusing your boxes, time, money and resources are lost.


CSA UTAH TOUR 2010:

Date: Monday, August 2nd

Fee: FREE! But please RSVP to Jeff at 801-557-0521 or jeff.williams@ut.usda.gov

Bus: There is room for approximately 45 people so “first come, first served”

Time: 8:30 to 3:00 p.m.

Bring: water, sun screen, hiking boots, hat, camera, writing materials, networking information

Departure time and place: Fashion Place West Trax Stop on Park and Ride at Winchester (6400 South and 222 West), bus leaves at 9 am

1st stop: Bell’s 9:30 to 10:30

2nd stop: East 11:00 to 12:00

Lunch: Please bring a brown bag lunch and drink

3rd stop: Zoe’s 1:00 to 2:00

Return time: about 3pm


Please email produce@zoegarden.com with any of your comments or questions.


From our garden to your kitchen, happy eating.

Jessica

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Weekly Share Item List: June 29, 2010




Hello Everyone,

This week there is a possibility of 20 varieties in your share.

Small Share:
Shallot Scapes (last portion for small shareholders)
Walla Walla Onions
Young Garlic
Green Leaf Lettuce
Collard Greens
Kohlrabi (white and purple venus varieties)
English Peas
Italian Parsley
Zoe's Honey (market value: $14.00-no more portions available)

Medium Share:
All of Small Share
Oak Leaf Lettuce
Shingiku
Cilantro

Large Share:
All of Medium Share
Bok Choy Sum
Garlic Scapes
Broccoli Raab
Chinese Snow Broccoli
Chinese Green Beans
Sugar Snap Peas
Yellow Snow Peas
Malabar Spinach
Cipollini Onions
Extra Portion of Collard Greens
Extra Kohlrabi
Extra Walla Walla Onions
Extra Scapes



HAVING A HARD TIME IDENTIFYING WHAT IS IN YOUR SHARE?
CLICK ABOVE TO ENLARGE IMAGE

Weekly Update From David:

RECOMMENDATIONS: David recommends using the kohlrabi in a coleslaw, grilling it or sauteeing it. Also, he is excited to share the Chinese Green Beans with members because he is really proud of the taste, and thinks it is "awesome". Also, he wanted to let everyone know that the texture of the Malabar Spinach is much like a cactus or succulent. Please let me know what you think of this weeks' share at produce@zoegarden.com.

MEMBER TIPS: Marianne recommends this site for ways to use scapes. Alissa recommends this site for directions on freezing portions of your share. Alissa also sent in the following idea for a quiche:

One thing I like to do for breakfast with my share is to make quiche. I pull the leafs off the stems of the greens, then chop the stems and saute them in butter with some of my shallot scapes; onion scapes and young garlic. Then I chop the leafs into small pieces and mix them in to the saute just until wilted. I add 4 eggs per quiche (usually I make three at a time and eat them all week for breakfast) and some cheese. You don't need cream or milk or butter that most quiche recipes call for because the water in the greens is enough to keep it moist. You can pour it into a crust or just into a baking dish without a crust. With a crust, bake at 350 for about 45 minutes. Without a crust it takes less time.

Thank you to Bethesda Renewal Centre and The Kitchen Garden for sharing ideas on how to use our produce!

If you have any particular questions about how to use the items in your share please send me an email at produce@zoegarden.com. Have a safe, and fun Independence Day.


From our garden to your kitchen, happy eating.

Jessica

Thursday, June 24, 2010

Simple Ways To Use Your Share

Photo Courtesy of Terry Walters

There are so many advantages to investing your time and money into a CSA. I am sure each of you have a particular reason that resonates most with you. However, there is something very different when you are given particular items instead of picking out what you would like for that week from the market. Combine that with any time constraints and all of a sudden a fridge full of fresh produce is hard to transform into something satisfying. What I try to remember when I am in the middle of my week is that with fresh sustainably grown produce the simpler the better.

So…how can the food we receive in our shares translate to a simple, delicious breakfast, lunch or even food you would eat on a road trip? Here are some ideas.


Dressings and Dips

They are able to complement any fresh green or lightly sautéed green. Combine that with legumes or grains that you have prepared in larger portions, and you have a quick, satisfying meal.

Simple Dressings: Both of these recipes for dressings are from Clean Food by Terry Walters. Compare the ingredients and notice how with only one or two ingredients, such as a different fruit juice, you can have a new dressing.

Apricot Vinaigrette

1 garlic clove, minced
1 small shallot, minced
Juice of 2 Meyer lemons
1⁄4 cup apricot juice
1⁄4 cup balsamic vinegar
1⁄2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon maple mustard
2 tablespoons maple syrup
Pinch of sea salt


Pomegranate Vinaigrette

1 garlic clove, minced
1 shallot, minced
1⁄3 cup pomegranate juice
1⁄2 cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon zesty honey mustard
Sea salt

Simple Dips: There are so many recipes for dips, but here are a few ideas from Clean Food. Try dipping your radishes, peas or I am even going to try to julienne my baby kohlrabi to create a dish reminscent of cole slaw.

Lemony Artichoke Dip

Green Goddess Dip

Satisfying Breakfast Ideas

photo courtesy of Progressive Pioneer

Green Smoothies: Progressive Pioneer is a wonderful blog to get great ideas forsimple yet delicious recipes. For a variation to this recipe try blending any variety of frozen or fresh fruit with some beet greens, green amaranth leaf, or Buttercrunch lettuce. If you are using fresh fruit you may want to add ice cubes or frozen plain yogurt to achieve the consistency of a smoothie.

Salad for breakfast? Although I do not initially crave it, a fresh salad has always kept me satisfied throughout the morning. Experiment with different greens for your salads. Try beet greens (which are a little sweeter), cranberries, sunflower seeds and a little oil and vinegar. Or mix in a bit of your dandelion greens with some of the Buttercrunch lettuce. Adding any type of legume, nut, seed, or hard boiled egg makes it a little more filling.


Photo Courtesy of The Star

Sautéing for breakfast? In Clean Food by Terry Walters she has a delicious recipe “Bok Choy and Chickpeas with Cashews”. Try using any of the greens we recieve in our share as a substitute for the Bok Choy.

Food On-The-Go

Whether it is a road trip or lunch here are some alternatives to soup, salads and sandwiches.
photo courtesy of Simple Organic

Sushi: If you need something quick and portable for lunch why not put together a sushi roll with some shingiku or finely chopped scapes? Also, instead of sushi rice try using quinoa for extra protein and nutrients.

Summer Rolls: Follow the link for a vegetarian recipe for summer rolls. Terry Walters also has delicious ideas for fresh rolls in her book like "Summer Rolls with Lemon Basil Pesto" or "Pad Thai Summer Rolls with Tamarind Dipping Sauce". My favorite part about her recipes is that her sauces do not use sugar.

Wraps: Create a delicious wrap by spreading cream cheese or any dip onto a tortilla and then adding any combo of fresh lettuce, herbs, greens, and any other favorites you have like  green apple slices, meat, peppers, julienned carrots, etc.

Email me at produce@zoegarden.com with how you use your share when you don't have a lot of time.

Wishing you a quick, nourishing meal when you need one,
 
Jessica
 
What was with all of the mention of Clean Food? Not an intentional plug because there are so many books on the market for cooking with fresh ingredients, but Terry Walters has crafted a book that is rooted in seasonal recipes that offer options without sugar, eggs, dairy, wheat or meat, but are flexible enough to include those items if you choose.

Weekly Share Item List: June 22, 2010 UPDATED

Good Morning,

I have some updates to the share item list.

Only the Large Share includes the following:
Italian Dandelion Greens
Beet Greens
Buttercrunch Lettuce
English Peas

I apologize for any confusion.

All the best,
Jessica

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Weekly Share Item List: June 22, 2010

Hello Everyone,

This week we have 22 varieties in our share.

Small Share:
Baby Kohlrabi
Beet Greens
Blue Kale
Broccoli Raab
Buttercrunch Lettuce
Chinese Snow Broccoli
Cilantro
Garlic Scapes
Shallot Scapes
Green Amaranth Leaf
Italian Dandelion Greens
Oak Leaf Lettuce
Cherry Belle Radishes
Red Leaf Lettuce
Red Orach also known as French Spinach
Shingiku
Sugar Snap Peas
Yellow Snow Peas
English Peas
Walla Walla Onions
Winter Savory
Young Garlic

Medium Share:
All of Small Share
Larger Quanities of Everything

Large Share:
All of Medium Share
Larger Quantities of Everything
2 extra baby kohlrabi
1 extra bag: including herbs, yellow snow peas and sugar snap peas.



HAVING A HARD TIME IDENTIFYING WHAT IS IN YOUR SHARE?
CLICK ABOVE TO ENLARGE IMAGE

Weekly Update from David:

SHARE SIZE: This season is starting out slowly because of the prolonged cold weather we had. But it always starts out slower, then builds, then wanes again in October. There will definitely be more variety and quantity soon: like squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers and eggplant. David, the farmer, tries really hard to make sure that over the course of the season, you receive at least 15% more than the value you paid (based on the prices he sells items at the farmer's market).


PHOTO CLARIFICATION
: David said the photo on the site (with cherries and berries) that represents a medium share was probably taken sometime in July. This year, the cherry crop, everyone's favorite, should be ready in the middle of July.

QUALITY: Is the quality of your produce satisfactory when you pick it up? Do you like the varieties you are recieiving? Please email us any of your feedback at produce@zoegarden.com.

UPCOMING WEEKS: Possibilities for next week include baby beets, raspberries and mulberries and honey along with greens, herbs, etc.

HONEY: David's honey is raw with no added water. Also, there are many different shades of honey due to the broad range of pollen that the bees are collecting at Zoe Garden. This helps if you use honey for allergies. Also, David promises that his honey is sustainably harvested. This means that David always leaves enough honey for the hives to survive during winter, and he never feeds the bees liquid sugar in order to take more honey.

MEMBER RECIPES: Thank you Harini for sharing the following recipe.

Barley, Kale and Mushroom Soup (adapted from a few different recipes)


1 bunch kale, rough chopped
5-6 crimini mushrooms (or baby bella), sliced
1/2 red onion, chopped into 1/2 inch chunks
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 bay leaf
4 sprigs fresh thyme
1 pinch herbs de provence
1 tbsp olive oil
1 cup barley
1 tbsp of grated parmesan (or parmagiano-reggiano)
plenty of stock (chicken or vegetable) or even just water (the herbs will flavor the soup perfectly even without stock)
salt and pepper

In a large soup pot, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add onions and garlic, and saute for a few minutes until onions become translucent. Add the mushrooms and saute until the mushrooms lose some liquid and start to brown. Next, add the kale. Stir for 1-2 minutes. Add generous amounts of stock/water - about 1.5 inches above the veggies. Rinse the barley in some warm water, drain, and then add the barley to the soup. Add the herbs de provence, bay leaf, salt and pepper, grated parmesan and the thyme leaves. (The thyme stems are woody, so be careful to add only the leaves to the soup.) Bring to a boil. Then cover and simmer on low heat until the barley is tender. (If you use quick-cooking barley, it should be done in about 20 mins or so. Otherwise, it might take up to 45 minutes.) If the liquid evaporates, add more stock. You could make this as thin or dense as you like. If you want less liquid, just simmer for longer so that the liquid evaporates. If you want it soupier, then add more stock and simmer for 5 minutes so that the stock takes the flavor of the herbs and veggies.

Serve with crusty bread. Habanero hot sauce add a great flavor to this soup, if you like heat. Enjoy!


Tomorrow, I will be posting some ideas for how to use your share for breakfasts, lunches, road trips and on-the-go.

From our garden to your kitchen, happy eating.

Jessica

Friday, June 18, 2010

Update: Weekly Share Items for Friday Pick-up

Good Afternoon,

Members who pick-up on Fridays will have a slightly different share. There will be no watercress, but an addition of buttercrunch lettuce. The watercress had gone to seed and therefore David decided to substitute the share with the lettuce. Please feel free to email me with any questions at produce@zoegarden.com.

Enjoy the weekend.

Jessica

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

Shallot Scapes, Garlic Scapes and Fennel Fronds

ABOVE: The Deliberate Agrarian had this great picture of garlic scapes.

After looking at the produce we were given this week the scapes and fennel are the items I was least familiar with. Therefore, I have included some ways to use them this week as well as a couple ways to preserve the items.

Shallot and Garlic Scapes

A Cooking Life and Big Oven are both blogs that have great examples of how to prepare the scapes while they are fresh.  A Cooking Life details how to grill the garlic scapes much as you would grill asparagus. Big Oven gives a recipe for a frittata with scapes. The links will guide you directly to the recipes.

Now, how to preserve all of the extra.

ABOVE: The Deliberate Agrarian gives a great account of how they pickled their garlic scapes.


Pickling Scapes: The following excerpt is from The Deliberate Agrarian.

The recipe we use for making pickled scapes is the Dilly Beans recipe found in the Ball Blue Book. Marlene’s copy of this book is missing the cover, the pages are food-stained, and she has written notes all through. That gives you an idea of how much she uses the book.

Here is the Dilly Beans recipe:

2 pounds green beans

1/4 cup canning salt

2-1/2 cups vinegar

2-1/2 cups water

1 teaspoon cayenne pepper, divided

4 cloves garlic, divided

4 heads dill, divided

Trim ends off green beans. Combine salt, vinegar and water in a large saucepot. Bring to a boil. Pack beans lengthwise into hot jars, leaving 1/4” headspace. Add 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, 1 clove garlic, and 1 head dill to each pint. Ladle hot liquid over beans, leaving ¼” headspace. Remove air bubbles. Adjust two-piece caps. Process pints and quarts 10 minutes in a boiling-water canner. Yield: about four pints.

We modified the recipe a bit. For example, we left out the garlic cloves. And since our dill is not yet ready to use, we put a tsp of dill seed in each pint jar.



ABOVE:  Garlic Scape Pesto from the blog In The Kitchen And On The Road With Dorie

GARLIC SCAPE AND ALMOND PESTO
In The Kitchen And On The Road With Dorie


Makes about 1 cup

10 garlic scapes, finely chopped
1/3 to 1/2 cup finely grated Parmesan (to taste and texture)
1/3 cup slivered almonds (you could toast them lightly, if you'd like)
About 1/2 cup olive oil
Sea salt
Put the scapes, 1/3 cup of the cheese, almonds and half the olive oil in the bowl of a food processor (or use a blender or a mortar and pestle). Whir to chop and blend all the ingredients and then add the remainder of the oil and, if you want, more cheese. If you like the texture, stop; if you'd like it a little thinner, add some more oil. Season with salt.

If you're not going to use the pesto immediately, press a piece of plastic against the surface to keep it from oxidizing. The pesto can be stored in the refrigerator for a couple of days or packed airtight and frozen for a couple of months, by which time tomatoes should be at their juciest.

Fennel

ABOVE: Penne with Fennel Pesto from the blog Recipe Interrupted

Penne with Fennel Pesto
Recipe Interrupted

Makes 4 servings, plus leftover pesto

Preparation time: 30 minutes

1/3 cup pistachios, toasted
2-3 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
1 ounce (about ½ cup) freshly grated Parmesan
1 teaspoon salt, plus more for pasta water
Ground black pepper, to taste
2 cups fennel fronds (usually from 2 fennel bulbs)
optional: 4-5 mint leaves, torn
about ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
juice of ½ lemon, or to taste
1 pound penne pasta
1 cup frozen peas


1.Put the pistachios, garlic, cheese, salt, and pepper in a food processor. Pulse a few times to grind slightly.

2.Add fennel and mint, if using, to the food processor. With the motor running, drizzle in the olive oil until the mixture is reduced to a paste and has a spreadable, but not greasy consistency. Taste and add salt if necessary. Squeeze in a little bit of lemon juice to taste.

3.Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Salt the water generously and cook the pasta until al dente.

4.While the pasta is cooking, set up a colander in the sink and put the frozen peas in it. (If you have fresh peas, by all means use them. You can add them to the boiling water in the last few minutes of cooking the pasta.)

5.When the pasta is done, drain the pasta in the colander. Return the pasta, along with the peas, into the pot. Stir in the pesto until pasta is lightly coated and flavorful. Squeeze in a little lemon juice, to taste.

6.Serve hot or at room temperature.


Fennel Infused OilFrom the blog Chowhound

To make the oil, faintly warm olive oil with fennel fronds, a cut up lemon, a pinch of chili flakes, and crushed whole garlic cloves. Let it meld together for an hour or so, then strain. Season with salt and pepper, use as a drizzle on the cooked fish as well as on the onion/fennel bed you roast the fish on. Keep the rest in the fridge to use again.

Please let me know what you think of these recipes. Don't forget that you can freeze the pesto for meals in later months. I think I will try the fennel pesto with penne since I'll be able to use up the rest of the mint from last week's share.

Here is to a satisfying meal on a cold, blustery night.

Jessica